object#

object n
1 *thing, article
Analogous words: *affair, concern, matter, thing: *form, figure, shape, configuration
2 objective, goal, end, aim, design, purpose, *intention, intent
Analogous words: *motive, incentive, inducement
Contrasted words: result, *effect, consequence
object vb Object, protest, remonstrate, expostulate, kick mean to oppose something (as a course, a procedure, a policy, or a project) especially by making known one's arguments against it.
Object carries so strong an implication of dislike or aversion that it often is lacking in a clear or definite implication of vocal or other outward opposition, though frequently such a reaction is suggested
{

why do you always object to everything he wishes to do for you

}
{

there's nothing wrong with being painted in the nude; artists do it all the time. But our silly husbands have a way of objecting to that sort of thing— Dahl

}
Protest (see also ASSERT 1) implies strong opposition and usually the presentation of objections in speech or in writing against the thing to which one objects
{

the residents of the district unanimously protested against the granting of the license

}
{

swearing and protesting against every delay in the work— Anderson

}
{

she marched with the pickets, protesting atmospheric testing— Kleiner

}
Remonstrate implies protestation but it carries so much stronger an implication of an attempt to convince or persuade than protest carries that it is especially appropriate when the objection is to something being done by a child, a friend, or a relative, rather than by an official or an impersonal agent, or when reproof is also implied
{

now and then a well-meaning friend of Sir Austin's ventured to remonstrate on the dangerous trial he was making in modelling any new plan of education for a youth— Meredith

}
{

"Father Joseph," he remonstrated, "you will never be able to take all these things back to Denver"— Cat her

}
Expostulate differs little from remonstrate, but it usually carries a heightened implication of firm, earnest, but friendly reasoning or insistence on the merits of one's arguments
{

the priestly brotherhood . . . prompt to persuade, expostulate, and warn— Cowper

}
{

lost his temper when reporters at his press conference expostulated against playing favorites— New Republic

}
Kick implies strenuous protestation and, usually, an exhibition of recalcitrancy or defiance
{

wherefore kick ye at my sacrifice and at mine offering—7 Sam 2:29

}
{

when the tax rate was raised for the fourth successive year, everybody kicked

}
{

I kicked at that and said that Asquith might be limited but he was honest— Laski

}
Analogous words: *demur, balk, scruple, jib, boggle, shy, stick, stickle: *criticize, denounce, reprobate
Antonyms: acquiesce
Contrasted words: *assent, consent, agree, accede

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Object — may refer to: Object (philosophy), a thing, being or concept Entity, something that is tangible and within the grasp of the senses As used in object relations theories of psychoanalysis, that to which a subject relates. Object (grammar), a… …   Wikipedia

  • Object — Ob ject ([o^]b j[e^]kt), n. [L. objectus. See {Object}, v. t.] 1. That which is put, or which may be regarded as put, in the way of some of the senses; something visible or tangible and persists for an appreciable time; as, he observed an object… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • object — ob·ject 1 / äb jikt/ n 1: something toward which thought, feeling, or action is directed see also natural object 2: the purpose or goal of something; esp in the civil law of Louisiana: the purpose for which a contract or obligation is formed… …   Law dictionary

  • Object-Z — is an object oriented extension to the Z notation developed at the University of Queensland, Australia. Object Z extends Z by the addition of language constructs resembling the object oriented paradigm, most notably, classes. Other object… …   Wikipedia

  • Object 47 — Studio album by Wire Released July 7th 2008 …   Wikipedia

  • object — object, objective nouns. Both words have the meaning ‘something sought or aimed at’ and in practice they are often interchangeable, although object is more common when followed by a qualifying construction, e.g. one with in or of (and is… …   Modern English usage

  • object — [äb′jikt, äbjekt; ] for v. [ əb jekt′, äbjekt′] n. [ME < ML objectum, something thrown in the way < L objectus, a casting before, that which appears, orig. pp. of objicere < ob (see OB ) + jacere, to throw: see JET1] 1. a thing that can… …   English World dictionary

  • Object — Ob*ject ([o^]b*j[e^]kt ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Objected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Objecting}.] [L. objectus, p. p. of objicere, obicere, to throw or put before, to oppose; ob (see {Ob }) + jacere to throw: cf. objecter. See {Jet} a shooting forth.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Object V — EP by Leaether Strip Released 1991 …   Wikipedia

  • object — the noun [14] and object the verb [15] have diverged considerably over the centuries, but they come from the same ultimate source: Latin obicere. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix ob ‘towards’ and jacere ‘throw’ (source of English… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.